Arms Cache Archive: Records on 2000 Caches Seized in Iraq in 2007

Documents: Arms caches seized in Iraq, October through December 2007

Source: U.S. Department of Defense

Notes: In response to a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request submitted by Small Arms Survey, US Central Command (CENTCOM) released database records on more than 2000 arms caches discovered in Iraq in a 3-month period from October to December 2007.  The records include information on the seized items, the date and location of the seizure, and the circumstances surrounding the seizure. CENTCOM also provided several storyboards containing photos and more extensive summaries of some of the seizures.

These and other documents on seized caches enable researchers tocover

– establish a baseline of illicit weapons in a particular region,

– track the evolution of insurgent arsenals over time,

– analyze storage patterns and concealment methods,

– document potential violations of arms embargoes, and

– identify (or corroborate identification of) specific models of weapons and ammunition.

Small Arms Survey has obtained hundreds of additional pages of documents on arms caches, many of which have been posted on this site.

Below are links to the database records and the accompanying storyboards. For more information on illicit weapons in Iraq, see Surveying the Battlefield: Illicit Arms in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Somalia.

Database records

1) October 1-15record_example

2) October 16- November 4

3) November 4-16

4) November 17-December 2

5) December 2-18

6) December 18-31

Storyboards

1) Mansour, 2 October 2007. Large cache found in an abandoned house by Iraqi National Police. Items included artillery rounds, mortar rounds, RPG rockets and launchers, machine guns, rifles, grenades, mines, body armor and various IED components (washing machine timers, ball bearings, ‘walkie talkie IED detonators,’ etc).

2oct07

2) Ghazaliyah, 4 October 2007. Acting on a tip from a local citizen, coalition forces found explosively formed penetrators (EFPs), IED components, an RPG and launcher, Iraqi police body armor, and other items.

Continue reading “Arms Cache Archive: Records on 2000 Caches Seized in Iraq in 2007”

Arms Cache Archive: Records on 2000 Caches Seized in Iraq in 2007

Arms Cache Archive: Iraq, October 2008

Documents: Arms caches seized in Iraq, October 2008

Source: U.S. Department of Defense

Notes: mortarAs part of ongoing efforts to improve understanding of illicit small arms, Small Arms Survey has acquired dozens of US government storyboards (succinct summaries) on arms caches discovered in Iraq. The following storyboards, which the Survey recently discovered on US Central Command’s website, summarize notable caches seized by US and Iraqi troops in October 2008. The documents were supposed to be released with similar storyboards in response to a 2009 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request submitted by the Survey. Instead, they were misfiled with responsive documents from an unrelated request.

The storyboards are useful for analyzing patterns in the acquisition of weapons by armed groups, identifying potential violations of arms embargoes, and corroborating – and expanding on – information in weapons identification guides.

The documents are posted as received from the responding agency. For more  information on illicit weapons in Iraq, see Surveying the Battlefield: Illicit Arms in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Somalia, and the following analysis by former Naval EOD officer John Ismay: Insight into How Insurgents Fought in Iraq and The Most Lethal Weapons Americans Faced in Iraq.

For more on Chemical weapons in Iraq, see ‘Chemical Weapons in Iraq: Revealing the Pentagon’s Long-held Secrets‘ by CJ Chivers.

Below are links to

1) Khadamiyah, 3 October 2008.

Items: (1) Iranian Rocket-propelled grenade (RPG), (1) RPG launcher, and (1) propellant; (1) Iraqi hand grenade. Includes photos of markings on the RPG, launcher, and propellant.

RPG_launcher_round

2) Unspecified location, 4 October 2008. Summary of 20 seized caches.

Items: Nearly 1400 mortar rounds (mostly Iraqi); 10 Russian AT-3B anti-tank guided missiles; (2) Russian PT-76 main guns; small caliber ammunition; IED components; and various other items.

Continue reading “Arms Cache Archive: Iraq, October 2008”

Arms Cache Archive: Iraq, October 2008

Detecting and preventing firearms diversion through end-use monitoring: examples from the US

Document: US Blue Lantern end-use monitoring program: firearms cases

Source: US GovernmentEUM

Date: Unspecified

Notes: As part of a study on the mechanics of small arms trafficking, the Small Arms Survey acquired summaries of ‘unfavorable determinations’ resulting from end-use checks of potential and completed exports of firearms from the United States. The checks were performed by the US Department of State as part of the Blue Lantern end-use monitoring program.  Among the more intriguing cases are

– The unauthorized re-export of ‘military-grade assault rifles’ from the armed forces of a former Soviet Republic to private end-users in Central America. The re-export was discovered during a post-shipment check, which also revealed inadequate record-keeping and ‘insufficient inventory controls’.

– An apparent attempt to divert a ‘large volume’ of AK-pattern rifles ostensibly intended for a Central American military.  A pre-shipment brokering check revealed that the military in question had no knowledge of the proposed export.

– The manufacture of ‘unlicensed replicas’ of exported firearms by a private reseller in South Asia.

The cases underscore the value of robust pre- and post-shipment monitoring of small arms exports. While most exporting states regularly engage in pre-shipment licensing reviews, far fewer actually check on their weapons after they are exported. Some of these incidents may not have been discovered had the US government not conducted post-shipment checks.

For more information on US end-use monitoring, see the annual reports on the Blue Lantern program.  For more information on arms trafficking from the US, see ‘Dribs and Drabs: The Mechanics of Small Arms Trafficking from the United States.

Detecting and preventing firearms diversion through end-use monitoring: examples from the US

IEDs in Iraq after the Surge – Part II

Documents: US Military storyboards on seized arms caches containing IEDs

Source: U.S. Department of Defenseefp

Publication Dates: January through March, 2009

Notes: As part of ongoing efforts to improve understanding of illicit small arms, Small Arms Survey has acquired dozens of US government storyboards (succinct summaries) on arms caches seized in Iraq. The following is the second installment of a multi-post collection of documents on seizures of IEDs and components. The IEDs were found in and around Baghdad, Iraq, from January through March 2009.

The documents were obtained by Small Arms Survey  and the Federation of American Scientists under the US Freedom of Information Act. They are posted as received from the responding agency.

Part one of this series is available here.

For a recent assessment of IEDs in Iraq and Syria, see Tracing the Supply of Components Used in Islamic State IEDs by Conflict Armament Research.

DOCUMENTS:

8 January 2009IED

9 January 2009

20 January 2009

24 January 2009 (shoe IEDs)

25 January 2009 Continue reading “IEDs in Iraq after the Surge – Part II”

IEDs in Iraq after the Surge – Part II

Improvised Explosive Devices seized in Iraq shortly after the ‘surge’

Documents: US Military storyboards on seized arms caches containing IEDs

Source: U.S. Department of DefenseIEDS_Iraq

Publication Dates: September through December, 2008

Notes: As part of ongoing efforts to improve understanding of illicit small arms, Small Arms Survey has acquired dozens of US government storyboards (succinct summaries) on arms caches seized in Iraq. The following 26 storyboards summarize the contents of caches containing improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and IED components.  The caches were seized in and around Baghdad, Iraq, from September through December 2008.

The documents were obtained by Small Arms Survey  and the Federation of American Scientists under the US Freedom of Information Act. They are posted as received from the responding agency.

For a recent assessment of IEDs in Iraq and Syria, see Tracing the Supply of Components Used in Islamic State IEDs by Conflict Armament Research.

DOCUMENTS:

2 September 2008

12 September 200813_Sep_08

11 September 2008

13 September 2008

14 September 2008

15 September 2008

17 September 2008

18 September 2008

18 September 2008 (2) Continue reading “Improvised Explosive Devices seized in Iraq shortly after the ‘surge’”

Improvised Explosive Devices seized in Iraq shortly after the ‘surge’

US Army analysis of the Islamic State’s modified vehicles

Document: Analysis of Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) Modified Vehicles

Source: U.S. Army’s National Ground Intelligence Center

ISIL_modified_vehiclesDate: 2015

Notes: This heavily redacted brief analyzes ISIL’s modification of cargo and engineering vehicles for combat operations.

The memo was obtained by the Small Arms Survey under the Freedom of Information Act.

US Army analysis of the Islamic State’s modified vehicles

Memo highlights concerns about spread of North Korean MANPADS production capabilities

Document: Information Memorandum – North Korea: Export of Man-Portable Air Defense System Production Capabilities May Damage Proliferation Control Efforts

Source: U.S. Defense Intelligence AgencyNK_Info_memo

Date: 5 September 2006

Notes: This heavily redacted memorandum highlights US military’s concerns about the North Korean government’s apparent willingness to export unspecified ‘capabilities’ to produce shoulder-fired, surface-to-air missiles, and the potential damage such exports could do to international efforts to counter the threat from shoulder-fired missiles.

The memo was obtained by the Small Arms Survey under the Freedom of Information Act.

Memo highlights concerns about spread of North Korean MANPADS production capabilities